Kelly Anorak

I’m finally home! The trip back was pretty dire (I really wish someone would get on with inventing human teleportation, please and thank you), but that’s what I get for living a million miles away. I’ve integrated my UK fabric purchases into my fabric stash, I’ve uploaded my photos, and I’ve spent some quality time with the cats, so I thought I’d finally blog about the Closet Case Files Kelly Anorak that I made up before my trip.

Photo 22-09-17, 9 38 10 AM
Best turtle impression

This jacket was so useful, it was the perfect weight to wear once we got further north and the weather started to cool down. I think it looks more stylish than my Waver raincoat, which I also took and wore loads (since it’s waterproof) but which is beginning to get a bit scruffy. I used a stretch twill from The Fabric Store, which I think was marked as Marc Jacobs. I’m always surprised at the rolls of designer fabric which pop up at TFS! It was the perfect colour for what I was after, and it’s quite nice to have a little bit of stretch in a casual jacket. I realised as I was assembling the navy fabric and gold hardware that I was copying this amazing Minoru hack that Sallie Oh made years ago and which I coveted, but didn’t think I had the skills (or the patience) to make such big changes to the pattern. I’m glad I procrastinated long enough for the Kelly pattern to be released and save me the hassle!

Photo 22-09-17, 9 40 18 AM (1)

I love hardware-heavy projects like this! I really wanted spring snaps rather than the ring snaps which I used on my Waver, but I haven’t seen them for sale anywhere in New Zealand. I was looking to buy a bunch of bag hardware at the same time, so I just bit the bullet and put an order into Pacific Trimming. It wasn’t too expensive, in the scheme of things, but shipping and the conversion rate definitely made it a bit of a splurge purchase! I got the snaps, draw string stoppers and cord ends from there, and I’m really happy with them. They’re all the same gold tone, which was important to me, and the snaps feel much more sturdy (and make a much more satisfying snapping noise) than the other type I’ve used. And they just look nicer! Similarly, the stoppers and end caps are nice and weighty and look good, I wish I had bought a few more sets. Of course, after I put the order in Closet Case Files released a gold toned version of their hardware kit, but never mind… The zip was a lucky find at Spotlight, I didn’t expect to find a gold and navy separating zip there but I got lucky! It was too long, but I don’t mind shortening zips.

Photo 22-09-17, 9 40 56 AM (1)

Photo 22-09-17, 9 40 07 AM

I used the scraps of Liberty lawn left over from my Willow Tank for the hem binding and the drawstring casing, and I’m really happy with how it looks against the navy. Instead of using standard cord for my drawstring I used some heavy cotton twill tape. I think it looks good, it’s a bit nautical! It’s flat, so squeezing it through the eyelet and the cord stopper (what are those called? I’m sure that isn’t the right word…) was slightly challenging, but now that they’re in place I won’t have to move them again! I also used the twill tape for a hanging loop inside the collar. Also, how good are those pockets? I love big pockets, and these ones can fit pretty much anything I want to put in them.

Photo 22-09-17, 9 39 01 AM

So, onto the pattern! I know there has been a bit of negativity around this pattern recently, but I didn’t personally have any issues with the drafting. Because I had to shorten the zip anyway I didn’t really pay attention to the recommended length on the pattern and just shortened it until it fit. I wish I had shortened it another inch, to be honest, because the end of the zipper pull hangs over the edge of the hem when it’s undone! I can’t see it, but I know that it’s there…I did have issues with the zipper and placket though, which were my own stupid fault. I was absolutely flying along on the Saturday I started this, everything was going really smoothly and I was really happy with my progress by the end of the day. On Sunday, I picked it up again, and realised that I had sewn the zip in with the wrong seam allowance, so there wasn’t enough room under the placket for the snaps. I was so upset! I considered carrying on and just fudging it, but I knew that would ultimately really annoy me, and I didn’t want to risk messing up the snaps after getting them all the way from LA! So I gritted my teeth and unpicked the whole damn lot. It’s definitely not as square or as nicely sewn now, as I had graded those seams pretty savagely, but at least the snaps are where they’re supposed to be! it turned out that I had just aligned the edge of the zipper tape with the edge of the fabric, instead of using a 5/8” seam allowance as instructed. Lesson learned there!

Photo 22-09-17, 9 36 47 AM (1)

There are some fitting issues here which I need to address before making this pattern again (I’m planning a waterproof version with the hood), mostly around the shoulders. Initially, I thought that I needed to do a narrow shoulder adjustment as the point of the shoulder is slipping down my arm, but now that I’ve worn it for 6 weeks I think that the more important adjustment I need to make is for a forward shoulder. The shoulder seam is sitting about an inch behind my actual shoulder, so that is definitely something I need to look into. I may also need to take some length out of that seam, but I’ll see how it looks after moving it forward! I could also lift the drawstring casing up a wee bit I think. but other than that, I think its pretty good really! There are some funny wrinkles in these photos, but I’m chalking those up to 1) the jacket being in and out of my suitcase for 2 weeks by the time these pictures were taken, and 2) it being super windy and it being blown against my body weirdly!

Photo 22-09-17, 9 36 53 AM (1)

Photo 22-09-17, 9 35 38 AM

I know this has been a long post, but I should also talk about this amazing place! These photos were taken on the island of Skye, and it was just so beautiful there. This is the ruin of Duntulm Castle, on the northern point of Skye. It’s slowly falling into the sea, so you can’t get closer than the fence (which I think is actually to keep the sheep out, rather than reckless tourists), but it was such a stunning, lonely spot. There was a fisherman down on the rocks below the cliff where I was standing, who I didn’t spot until he popped up in the middle of these photos, which is why I look a bit sheepish in some of them! I absolutely loved Skye, I would love to go back for longer some time. I bought the necklace I’m wearing in these pictures (its by Wolf and Moon) from a lovely shop in Portree called Òr, where I also got my birthday present Hilary Grant scarf (this one!). I’m almost wishing we could have a bit more cold weather so that I could wear that scarf now rather than waiting for winter (but not really, bring on summer!)

 

 

Advertisements

Going vintage for the Goodwood Revival

Hello from a very damp Scotland! I’m currently in Fort William, in the western highlands, and it’s utterly spectacular (even when it’s pissing down). We’ve had a whirlwind two weeks, driving from London down to the south coast before heading north through Wales and the Lake District to Scotland. Tomorrow we head to Skye and then to the Outer Hebrides later in the week, which I’m very excited about! If you follow me on instagram you’ll know that we went to the Goodwood Revival while we were down south. I know I’ve mentioned it on here before, but in short it’s a vintage motorsport event which celebrates British racing history from the 40’s through to the 70’s, and Hamish has wanted to attend for as long as I’ve known him. I’m not really interested in Motorsport at all, but dressing up in period gear is pretty much mandatory at the Revival, so I knew there would be something to interest me there!


As it was in September in England I decided that separates (with trousers) would be a sensible option. I was briefly tempted to make a 1940s rayon day dress, but I very glad that I stuck with my original plan because the weather turned after lunch and it got rather cold and wet! I was still under dressed (could have done with some gumboots and an umbrella), but I was very glad not to be in a flimsy dress…


Both patterns are from Wearing History, the Smooth Sailing Blouse, and the Homefront Overalls. Obviously these aren’t overalls, but there is a classic 1940’s trouser pattern included! The shirt is made in a Liberty Tana Lawn, and it was really fun to put together. The lawn gathered beautifully, and made it really easy to sew the gathered front and back to the yoke, and to set in those big puff sleeves in. I was a bit concerned about the size of those sleeves and the collar, they would be all balanced out by a big 1940’s hairdo but obviously that wasn’t an option for me! It was definitely the look that I was going for though, so I carried on. I used red shell buttons which match the roses, but you can barely see them in these pictures because I forgot to put my sunglasses back in my bag. I was still hoping I might need them again that afternoon…


The trousers are made out of a fairly heavy brushed twill, also from The Fabric Store. I really like the colour, though perhaps I should have picked a less camouflaging backdrop to have my photos in front of! The trousers were very simple to put together, but I should have picked a size smaller as they came out absolutely huge initially. I ended up taking them in at the pleats and darts, and at the front and back crotch seams to get them to fit. I couldn’t mess with the side seams because I added a grown-on button placket to get in and out of them instead of using a lapped zip. 


The overalls close with a button placket, but I had only printed the trouser pieces so I improvised. It wasn’t difficult to add a curved placket piece to the side seam, but it did make it more difficult to take them in.


I faced the waistband and placket with the scraps of Liberty left over from the shirt to reduce bulk, and I think it looks really cute! The trousers are definitely a vintage fit, with a much lower crotch than modern trouser patterns. It took a bit of getting used to, but they were very comfortable. I always forget how different the proportions of vintage clothes can be! Both patterns went together beautifully, and though the instructions were a bit more sparse than some indie brands they were clear and perfectly adequate. 


To finish off my kind-of Land Girl outfit I wore my brown heeled oxfords and a cream cardigan, and a silk headacarf borrowed from my friend Lauren to cover up my non-era-appropriate haircut. I also took the straw bag that Hamish gave me for Christmas a few years ago. It just matched so perfectly that I couldn’t not take it, but to be honest it was a pain in the arse! A bag with a shoulder strap would have been much better, I’m sure that the reason I got hardly any photos of the event is because one hand was constantly occupied with my bag. I’ll need to remember that for next time…


Hamish was attired even more practically, I was jealous of his tweed jacket when the rain set in! I thought I could pinch some of his photos, as he took loads, but of course they were all of the cars rather than the other attendees! It was pretty amazing though, a scroll through the #goodwoodrevival2017 hashtag on instagram gives a pretty good overview. Some people had such amazing authentic vintage gear, it was awesome to see it out being worn.


I’m hoping to get some photos of other things I made for this trip in some dramatic Scottish locations, hopefully I can get some good shots! 

The raincoat which nearly killed me…

I’m a very selfish maker, I hardly ever sew or knit for other people. I’ll sew for my mum (because she’s awesome), and I’ll sew or knit for Hamish (because he’s super fussy about buying clothes, and I’m still trying to get him out of tee shirts that he’s been wearing since before we got together, 10 years ago), and I’ll make gifts for special people in my life, but that’s about it. I don’t usually feel guilty about this, but when my sister asked me to make her a raincoat I felt a bit bad that I had never sewn for her before! I was planning my own raincoat at the time, using the Papercut Waver Jacket pattern, and as Abby also liked the pattern I figured it would be easy enough to make two! Now, if you’ve just followed that link to see my version of the Waver, you’ll notice that I blogged it a while ago. In fact, the fabric for both of our raincoats was bought from Drapers Fabrics when we last visited Auckland…in September 2015. This raincoat was my longest ever work in progress! It was probably also one of my worst ever sewing experiences, and there is definitely a strong correlation between those facts…

P1040230

I made her the longer version of the Waver, with the hood and the drawstring waist. I wish I had made the longer version for me too, its a much more practical length for a rain coat! My sister is tiny, so I re-traced the pattern and cut her an XXS, then took an inch off the waist and the hem. She has a lot of hair though (I’m pretty sure she got her full allocation of hair and then half of what should have been mine), so I left the hood at its original size instead of shortening it like I did for mine. I also left the sleeves at full length. I made the same aesthetic modifications to both jackets, adding in-seam pockets behind the patch pockets and a self-fabric facing to the hood.

P1040148P1040232

So the pattern wasn’t the problem with this project at all. I cut Abby’s coat just after I finished mine, intending to have both done by winter 2016. it was as I was cutting up the waterproof nylon that we’d picked that I started to realise what I had done to myself. This fabric rolled along it’s cut edges worse than anything I have ever dealt with before, all of my newly cut pieces were rolling up into little skinny tubes before my eyes! It’s also completely rigid, there was no easing anything or using any of the tricks I’ve learned to sew nice curved seams over the years. I’m so glad that we picked a pattern with raglan sleeves instead of set in ones! It wouldn’t hold a crease at all once it cooled down (though at least it didn’t melt), and it slipped all over the place under my presser foot, making the stitches an uneven length and the tension a bit wonky. I wanted to cry after a few seams! It was worse than silk velvet, than tissue knit, worse than bag leather or the finest chiffon. The shifty, slippery silk satin lining Abby picked out was honestly a dream to sew by comparison.

P1040147

So I put it aside, meaning to come back to it once I had a better idea of how to deal with the fabric. And then it languished, for a whole year, until my sister started asking pointed questions about it’s whereabouts at the beginning of autumn this year. I really did feel guilty then, so I braced myself and pulled it out of the WIP bag of shame. It was still an absolute bastard to sew, but I used a super fine microtex needle which helped with my dodgy looking stitches, and I topstitched where I could to keep the seam allowances flat. I really wanted to seal the seams to make it as waterproof as possible, especially after topstitching them, but I couldn’t find seam sealing tape anywhere, even online sources wouldn’t ship to New Zealand for some reason. Eventually Hamish suggested I get some tent seam sealing glue from a camping store (I got this one), which was a brilliant idea. It comes as a sponge-topped glue stick like I remember from primary school, and I just painted it in an inch wide strip over each seam on the inside. I doubt it’ll be as effective as a sealing tape in the long run, but it seems to be working for now!

P1040150P1040154

The press studs are the same as the ones I used on my Waver, and I used the same round elastic for the drawstring as in mine. It’s much more comfortable than a rigid cord! Abby had to have two photoshoots for me to get pictures for this post, there’s something weird happening with my camera and pictures keep coming out unfocused. And it isn’t just my shaky hands, it happens when I use the self timer too! At least I know she’s wearing it though, I would’ve hated to go through all that and then have her not like it!

P1040155

Oslo Coat

I’ve got my laptop back! It only took six weeks… Happily it seems to be fixed, my tracking pad isn’t freaking out and opening random windows or menus or zooming instead of moving the cursor, so that’s a definite improvement! I have quite the backlog of projects to blog, including a bunch of sewing I’ve done for our upcoming trip (than you to everyone who has given me trip suggestions, either here or on Instagram, I really appreciate it!), but I’m hoping to get a lot of those projects photographed and blogged while we’re away. but first, I’m going to show you my end-of-winter coat, before it gets to unseasonable!

P1040241

This is the Oslo coat, a recent release from Tessuti. Emma and I were messaging about winter coat patterns the day this was released, and we both decided it was the one to make! it was nice to have a sewing buddy to troubleshoot with! Emma also took these photos, we visited the Parkin Drawing Exhibiton at the Academy of Fine Arts Gallery, and got some photos. The piece I’m standing in front of was my favourite, it’s by Jae Kang and is called 4000 Stains of Breath.

P1040244

P1040251

I really like the silhouette of this coat, I don’t have anything like it in my wardrobe. I was a bit worried about the size of the shawl collar, I thought it made my head look disproportionately small, but it looks ok in these pictures! I used a reasonably fine wool in an interesting not-quite-black colour for the outer, and a blush pink silk/cotton blend for the lining, both from The Fabric Warehouse. The coat looks black in these pictures, but against a true black or grey it looks deepest green, or even inky navy in some lights. Whatever colour it looks, it’s a nice neutral. I really struggled to find a button I liked, until I had a good rummage through the stash and came up with this geometric wooden one. I think the matte black stain on the wood looks really nice against the wool, and it suits the modern, minimalist look of the coat. Unfortunately, being black on black, it was really hard to photograph!

P1040246P1040247

I have to admit, I was a bit confused about some of the instructions for the Oslo. I’ve made a couple of Tessuti patterns in the past, so I was prepared for photos instead of illustrations, but I did struggle a bit with the fabrics they had chosen for the sample. the right and wrong sides of the fabric were very similar, and the lining fabric was a similar colour too, and I just found that I had to concentrate a bit more than usual to get through this one without unpicking too much! It was good to be able to message Emma to see if she had any insight into the bits that tripped me up. The pattern itself is really nicely drafted, it all fits together beautifully and the shaping in those raglan sleeves is particularly nice. I was also worried that it might swamp me a bit, as it has no shaping in the back or sides, but I like the oversized, nearly cocoon shape that it has. My measurements put me in a couple of sizes, but based on the finished garment measurements I went with a straight size 10, which I think was a good choice. The main thing I would change if I was to make it again would be to raise the pockets by a couple of inches. It was really stupid of me not to check the height before sewing up most of the coat, and they’re low enough and deep enough that my arms are pretty much straight when my hands are in them!

P1040240

I made this coat as part of my #summerofbasics entry (obviously mine is a Winter edition) over on Instagram. The challenge was to make three basic pieces which could be worn together for the appropriate season, so my pieces were this coat, my Ginger jeans, and the as-yet-unblogged Melilot shirt that you can see peeking out of my jumper in these pictures. I’m really pleased with all three garments, and I think they work nicely together. I’ll certainly get plenty of wear out of the jeans and shirt, but I don’t really want to hope for lots of opportunities to wear the coat! There have been some hints of Spring around Wellington this week, I can’t wait…

A clutch of Ida’s

A couple of months ago Kylie from Kylie and the Machine got in touch via Instagram and asked if I’d like to test her first pattern, a fold-over clutch bag she was releasing just in time for Mothers Day. I’ve never tested a pattern before, and I’d be pretty wary of testing a garment (I feel like there would be a lot of pressure involved in that, rightly or wrongly!), but a bag I could manage. The Ida Clutch is a simple sew, with nice clear instructions, and can be made in a variety of materials. I’ve used leather for all of mine, but there are some really cute versions in canvas and linen on Instagram, and Kylie has made an awesome version out of a coffee sack and some clear vinyl. Best of all, its a free pattern!

P1040197P1040198

I made my first clutch out of a piece of gorgeous cornflower blue Tory Burch leather which I got at The Fabric Store. I really love the leather pieces they have at TFS, I’ve amassed quite a collection of smaller pieces so it’s nice to have something to make out of them! I used some of that never-ending Liberty poplin remnant that has been showing up in all of my posts for the lining, I thought it was a good match. I made a couple of modifications to the pattern (bad tester!), to accommodate the thickness of this piece of leather. I trimmed the seam allowance off the top edge and just top-stitched the raw edge to the zip rather than folding it under as you would if using a thinner material, and I also cut the bulk of the darts out after I sewed them. I didn’t interface the leather, but I did use a lightweight fusible on the lining. Finally, I added a loop of leather with a D ring through it to the side seam just below the fold line, so that I could add a wrist strap. I love the idea of a clutch bag, but realistically I know that I’d never keep hold of a bag without a handle of some description!

P1040194P1040195P1040196

The second bag I made was a birthday present for a friend. I used some super soft and lightweight leather, again from TFS. This one I sewed up exactly as the instructions suggest, since the leather was so thin, including using both interfacing pieces on the leather. The lining is some cotton duck from Spotlight, which is probably a bit heavy for lining such a thin piece of leather, but I liked the way it looked with the gold hardware! I really like the metal zip and magnetic closure with the gold toned G-hooks and rivets, I think that everything matching helps to make the bags look more professional. I made a wrist strap for this one too, but somehow managed to not take any photos of it. Its just the same as the one on the blue bag though!

P1040201

For my third version I decided to do some very mild pattern hacking. I had this piece of nude patent leather (again from The Fabric Store, try to hide your surprise), and I had been wanting a small cross-body bag. The patent leather is thicker than the blue leather I used first, so I made the same modifications. My machine was deeply unhappy about sewing through more than two layers of this leather (even two was a struggle some times), but we managed. I ended up hand sewing the corner seams at the darts, because I couldn’t get my poor machine to punch through four layers of leather! I used leather needles in my machine, and used upholstery thread to sew the whole bag. The patent side of the leather was sticky enough that the feed dogs couldn’t move it under my presser foot, so I followed the advice of the internet and stuck some sellotape to the underside of the foot which fixed that issue!

P1040202

Initially I was going to have this bag fold over like the clutch versions, but the leather was just too thick for it to fold nicely, and I decided that it would probably be a more useful size if I left it upright! The lining is the same pink and gold flamingo cotton that I lined my Genoa Tote with, I still really like it! I do wish I had added a pocket though…

P1040204

I added a D ring to either side, just below the zip, to attach the shoulder strap. Cutting the strap was probably the hardest part of all, I had to cut six lengths of leather the same size, as my piece of leather wasn’t long enough for a single strap. I sewed the strips wrong sides together to make the strap stronger, and because it looks better not to have the napped side of the leather showing. I couldn’t decide how long I wanted the strap to end up, so I cut it 1/3 of the way along, and added the buckle so that I could adjust the length. It took me a wee while to figure out how I was going to secure the buckle and the loop of leather that holds the strap down, but in the end I decided to fold the whole lot into a sandwich and hammer a rivet through it! It’s not the most elegant solution, but it’s covered by the strap so I figured I could live with it. I also added two rivets to the join in the strap, just to add a bit of strength to it. I tend to be quite hard on my bags!

P1040207P1040209

I’ve decided I like sewing bags, they’re useful and there’s no fitting issues to trip me up! This one is big enough to fit my sunglasses and my phone and the handful of lipsticks/balms which I seem to need to have on me at all times, so I feel like it’ll be a useful bag for running around town. It’ll be perfect to take to the UK in a few months!

Finally, Ginger Jeans!

Making myself a pair of Ginger Jeans has been on my to-do list since the pattern was released (seriously, it’s been on my 2014, ’15 and ’16 Top 5 goals list…), and I’ve finally knuckled down and made them. Just like with my Safran Jeans, they really weren’t any more difficult to make than any other garment with a moderate number of pieces, definitely easier than a winter coat (and 100% easier than the raincoat I’ve recently finished for my sister!)

P1040174

Check them out! These are view B, the high waisted/skinny leg version of this pattern, I like my jeans to sit at my natural waist and these are pretty much spot on. I didn’t make any major pattern changes to this version, I thought I should make them up as is for my first shot and then tinker with my next pair! To be honest, I was amazed at how well they fit straight out of the packet. I took 2” off the hem (next time I’ll take it out higher on the leg to keep the hem skinnier), and moved the pockets up 5/8”, and took out a bit of extra fabric at the outer side of each knee. For my next pair I’m going to play with a knock-knee adjustment, I think that should help fix the diagonal wrinkles at the knee that I have with this pair and my Safran jeans. I might also take a wedge out of each side of the yoke, there’s a wee bit of gaping at the back waistband. Other than that though, I think they’re really good!

P1040191

I put in the pocket stay option too, it does help to make the front feel nice and snug! I used more of that Liberty Poplin remnant that I’ve used for every pocket bag/under collar/yoke lining/bag lining since I bought it. There’s still plenty left, so expect to see it again! The denim I used is from The Fabric Store, of course. I bought it years ago, with the intention to make these jeans with it! When I pulled it out of my stash last weekend, I was surprised by how lightweight it was, I had remembered it being much heftier. It meant it was really easy to cut and sew, but these aren’t really winter weight jeans! It also felt quite rigid, and I was worried that I hadn’t bought denim with the right stretch percentage, but it turns out that next to the 30% stretch that my Safran Jeans have, this 2% lycra/cotton blend just feels stiff!

P1040176

I used a hardware kit from Closet Case Files (the gold colour way), and I really love the result. The zip is especially nice, the pull is really low profile compared to other zips I’ve used, and it helps the whole fly sit so nice and flat. I also love that the button and the rivets match, it looks all so nice and professional! I was really scared of putting the rivets in, I was sure I was going to ruin everything at the final step! I watched the video tutorial on the Closet Case Files Blog, and everything was really simple in the end. I just had to whack everything harder than I expected, and avoid stabbing myself with the awl (and the rivet posts, they were pointy!). For thread, I just used all-purpose Gutermann thread for construction, but I used Sulky thread for the topstitching. I’ve had so many issues with topstitching thread in my machine, and I thought that the slippery, shiny Sulky thread would show up nicely and my machine wouldn’t have a tantrum every time I tried to sew with it.

P1040179

I’m amazed at the difference moving the pockets made! They looked okay at the marked position on the pattern, but shifting them up 5/8” has made my bum look much better. I think the size and shape of the pockets is excellent, Heather Lou knows what she’s doing!

P1040185

I was a little bit worried about how firm and tight these felt when I first put them on, but after a few hours they loosened up nicely, especially around the knees (just as well, I thought I might have over-fitted them around there). I’m not sure how well this denim will hold up, to be honest. They’re comfortable now, but I have a feeling that they might keep bagging out and will need lots of washing to keep them in shape! I interfaced the waistband with the same hefty knit interfacing I used in my Safran Jeans, so hopefully they’ll stay up…

P1040189

Unfortunately, it turns out that Sulky thread really isn’t cut out for top stitching, especially not on a stretch fabric under stress! After a day of wear, I had popped several lines of topstitching on the pockets and around my bum. This morning I went back and re-did all that topstitching on the back crotch seam and pockets with normal thread in the same colour, and hopefully it’ll hold up better. I thought that since I had seen Sulky thread being used for topstitching on bags that it would be okay, but of course bags aren’t usually stretch fabric or being stressed like those seams, so I shouldn’t be surprised really! I have some heavier stretch denim in grey waiting to be made into another pair of Gingers, so for those I’ll use upholstery thread for the topstitching. I know my machine will sew with that, because I use it to sew leather!

P1040181P1040182P1040183

I really enjoyed making these, even though there were a few setbacks at the last moment! I like the precision of doing that  top stitching, and all of the other components like the bar tacks and rivets and fly make these a really fun project to work on, especially as I sewed them up in short bursts between writing an assignment. Best of all, I’m really happy with the final product! Stupid that it took me so long to make them really…

P1040172

Finally, I thought I should get a picture of this tee shirt, as it hasn’t made the blog yet! It’s a Molly Tee, from the Sew Over It City Break Capsule Wardrobe e-book. I really like the shape of it, especially the curved hem and the wide scoop neckline. I turned the sleeve hems up and hand stitched the cuffs rather than just hemming them, just for something a bit different. I keep meaning to make the dress version, but it keeps getting bumped down the list. Maybe for summer!

A toasty sweater

Well, winter has arrived a month early in New Zealand! There’s snow on the hills around Wellington, and a savage southerly is whipping through the city. Time to sew some of my stashed merino!

P1040140

I really wanted to make the Toaster Sweater pattern from Sew House Seven after seeing so many versions made up during the northern hemisphere winter, I love the split hem with its mitred corners and the funnel neck of version 2. I know I’m in the minority when it comes to the online sewing community, but I really hate turtle necks. I just hate having anything snug around my neck, even tightly wrapped scarves make me feel like I’m suffocating. I thought the funnel neck on this pattern would be wide enough not to freak me out though, and I was right!

P1040136 (2)

I used some merino interlock from The Fabric Store, and it is the softest, cuddliest merino I’ve ever sewn with. It has a bit more heft than most merino jersey I’ve sewn (obviously, as it’s a double knit), so I thought it might have enough body to keep the shape of the neckline but still drape nicely. I think I was mostly right, the funnel neck does sag a bit in the centre front, but I think if I had interfaced it it might have ended up too stiff.

P1040137 (2)

I cut it out in a single layer so that I could match the stripes, which was pretty successful. The merino is so soft and stretchy that it was pretty forgiving, but it was a bit tricky to keep it square as I was cutting it out. It also wanted to grow and shift as I sewed it, so I used about 15 times as many pins as I usually would when sewing a knit!

That mitred hem is possibly my favourite part. It was simple enough to sew, but looks so nice and clean! I think I’ll definitely be borrowing that part of the pattern for other tops, it will be easy enough to graft onto another hem.

P1040144 (2)

P1040141 (2)

So there were a few things about this pattern which I found a bit odd. I had never heard of a double stitch before, which is the method recommended for constructing this top, but it’s when you sew a row of straight stitches and then a row of zigzags next to it. I’m sure it probably works (otherwise it wouldn’t be in the instructions, right?), but I was weirded out by it enough that I just used a narrow zigzag stitch to sew the shoulders and neckline, and then overlocked the side seams and sleeves. the hems are all top-stitched with a twin needle, as usual. I also thought it was weird that the neck facing which folds under to give the funnel shape didn’t extend to the shoulder seams, it means that it’s a bit messy around the shoulders on the inside. Its also super short! I’m really short waisted, and this is the shortest length I would want it to be. Tall sewers beware!

P1040139

If I make another Toaster Sweater 2, I think I’ll extend the facing piece so that I can catch it in the shoulder seams when I sew in the sleeves, just to keep it neat and hold down the facing a bit more securely. I think I might go down a size as well. This is the Medium, which is where my measurements put me, but I wonder if it would be a better fit in a Small. In this drapey knit I think the slightly oversized look is fine, but I have a more structured cream wool tentatively earmarked which I think would be a bit tent-like in the bigger size!

P1040145 (2)

I do like the slightly 1960’s beatnik vibe this top has, especially with my Safran Jeans and some flats. I just need to find a poetry slam or something (I wish I could find a poetry slam, does Wellington have such a thing? I so desperately wanted to see Kate Tempest in September, but she’s only doing one show while we’re in the UK and its the day before the only other thing we have tickets for. Such a bummer!) Zelda also gives it the cat-fur seal of approval, so it must be good. A few more snuggly wool tops, and the southerly can come at me!